I’m not the only one micro-planning foreign transport options, right?

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Fabrizio Verrecchia on Unsplash

I went to Copenhagen a few years ago for my first solo trip abroad and my god, did I research the city’s transport to the nth degree. Before I left the UK, I knew exactly where the metro station was in the airport, the ticket I had to buy to get into the city centre and how I would get around after that. I researched the buses, the trams, the bicycle hire outlets, even the distances it’d take me to walk everywhere if I eschewed all of those.

It’s not that I need to plan everything when I go away…


As it turns out, you’re allowed to give up whenever you fancy

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by averie woodard on Unsplash

It’s been three years since I quit drinking, something I never thought I would do.

It wasn’t so much as a battle or even much of a struggle at all in the end; it was a decision that I made, that I was completely in charge of.

An expectation

I grew up in a society where drinking from 18 onwards (16 at least, let’s face it), was a given. Every adult, in my eyes at least, drank alcohol even though my parents sparsely did. …


App-based travel is set to get a whole lot simpler

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Marek Rucinski on Unsplash

This isn’t another article on how Covid-19 has changed the world. Both you and I need a break from that. However, this country has discovered that it can upturn its traditional way of functioning and make sweeping changes in an extraordinarily short amount of time. It’s this discovery that is paving the way for a revolution.

MaaS — a transport revolution coming to a town near you

MaaS stands for Mobility-as-a-Service (which is not something you should try to say quickly when low on sleep).

Essentially, MaaS is the integration of multiple modes of transport — including public and private, but not personal — which users can access through a single…


Explore different cuisines this holiday season

Image for post
Image for post

December and early January are times for traditions but the holiday season is also perfect for experimenting with new recipes. We all grow up with the festive recipes in our families and cultures but it’s fascinating to look outside those tried-and-tested favourites to find even more glory.

The festive period has lots of similarities across the world. Roasting meat is a particular commonality although fish is also heavily emphasised in many nations. Earthy vegetables take a leading role during this time too, especially in northern hemisphere nations where warmth and cosiness are prioritised.

No matter which country you’re eating in…


You’re only pouring petrol on an otherwise manageable fire

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

Alcohol has long been sold to us as something to help us relax, make evenings more fun and kick off the weekend. I don’t know why you started drinking, but Teenage Me at no point thought, ‘man, school was tough this week, I just need a little tipple to kick back with in front of a film to really relax’.

Yeah. No.

I, like plenty of other people, started drinking because it quashed the teenage anxiety for a moment and allowed me to be someone cooler. Or, at least, that’s how it felt, which is all I was going on.


Reassessing the way we buy food and choosing budget-friendly options

Image for post
Image for post

You might opt for the cheaper products in the supermarket but have you ever stopped to really think about how you spend on food? Have you ever thought that perhaps ‘cheap’ doesn’t always mean ‘cost-effective’ or even ‘responsible’?

The reset brought on by Covid-19

Global history has been marred by recessions but nothing in memory comes close to the worldwide economic and health shock of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Suddenly, not only is our health at risk, but our livelihoods and access to basic necessities such as food are too. …


The key is in the question: who are you running for?

Image for post
Image for post

I don’t know about you, but I find winter running simultaneously the most enjoyable and the hardest. Running in the cold isn’t the hard part though. The hard part is motivating yourself to get out the door and start.

When I’m cold (which I almost always am working at home), the idea of going out in the cold does not fill me with joy. Similarly, when I’m warm in bed at 7am, the idea of going out in the cold doesn’t have me leaping for the door.

In short, you can’t wait for motivation to come. It doesn’t come first…


Could regenerating the earth’s topsoil reverse climate change?

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jadon Calvert on Unsplash

It’s easy to spend an awful lot of our lives with our heads buried in the sand. We think that everything is, broadly, fine. The news rains down tales of disaster and woe but we get fatigued — sure, bad stuff happens, what’s new?

Most of us have experienced the overwhelming nature of COVID-19 because it affects each and every one of us. And not much does. But, by and large, we only have so much mental space for Huge Issues. It’s understandable that we try to ignore them as much as possible. …


It’s a fallacy that we need pesticides to grow food for the world

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Andrei Stratu on Unsplash

Have you ever got to the supermarket with the intention of buying organic, only to baulk at the extra price and opt for conventional produce instead?

It’s okay, we’ve all been there.

The problem is though, the way non-organic produce is grown throws up serious issues. Not only are pesticides cocktails of toxins, untested in combination, but the methods conventional agriculture uses are destroying environments and soils.

In fact, in the US, topsoil (where the overwhelming majority of crops are grown), is disappearing 10 times faster than it’s being replaced. …


A flourishing wine region created in the blink of an eye

Image for post
Image for post
McLaren Vale wine region, South Australia

In one of the nine Great Wine Capitals of the World, the McLaren Vale region is renowned for its exquisite grapes. Lying between the St. Vincent Gulf coastline and the foothills of the Mount Lofty Ranges in South Australia, the vineyards here lie in fertile soils, lapping up the Mediterranean climate.

While its location and reputation are on the grand side, McLaren Vale has another impressive string to its bow. It has the highest amount of certified organic vineyards in Australia, including the fantastic Angove Family Winemakers.

With a culture of organic processes as well as a dedication to biodynamic…

Kitiara Pascoe

Travel and Outdoor Writer | Journalist | Author of In Bed with the Atlantic (Fernhurst, 2018) | New book pub’d by Quarto coming 2021 | kitiarapascoe.com

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store